Notification [x]
Abigail
Personal Profile Business Profile Social Profile
Connection: No connection
Profile
Smoking Habits: Rarely
Drinking Habits: Regularly
Interests I'd like to share with others: Fishing, Nightclubs/Dancing, Television-I love TV, Gardening, Dining out-I really like good food, Spectator Sports, No Answer, News, Travel/Sightseeing, Wine Tasting, Family Outings, Drama-Plays/Musicals, Photography
My Favorite Sports: Soccer, Rock Climbing, Surfing, Biking, Cricket, Martial Arts, Skiing, Dancing, Aerobics, Bowling, Tennis/Racquet Sports, Golf, Football, Skating, Weights/Machines, Scuba Diving, Billiards/Pool, Other forms of excercise, Basketball, Jogging, Swimming, Walking/Hiking, Baseball
Overview
Descartes develops a correspondence theory of truth. However, for Descartes, truth is always going to have to remain private. He believes we have direct and immediate contact with our own ideas. Whatever we see we bring back to our minds. If we don not like what that something, then we distort it. Our eyes and other senses distort the truth and can deceive us. Descarte says: I have accepted as possessed of the highest truth and certainty I have learned either from the senses or through the senses. Now these senses I have sometimes found to be deceptive; and it is only prudent never to place complete confidence in that by which we have even once been deceived. (Descartes, Rene, "Meditations," Struhl, Paula Rothenberg, and Struhl Karsten J., editors, Philosophy Now. Random House: 1980, P. 88)
Here Hume goes too far. In defense of his own argument, he makes a claim he cannot prove through experience. He is rationalizing that experiences differ between individuals because we all have different senses. Other beings can have knowledge of cruelty and generosity, even if it is not in the nature to behave in such a way. However, these senses are a product of a beings past experiences and rationalization of those experiences not just one or the other as Descartes and Hume would have us think.
Friends
view all >>
My Wall
Abigail
There are many similarities between Buddhism and Hinduism so it is a good idea to ensure you understand the differences and similarities between them. Hinduism (commonly called Sanatana Dharma, roughly translated as "Perennial Faith") is characterized by a diverse array of belief systems, practices and scriptures.

 16 hours ago
Cole  10 hours ago
huh???

Abigail -> Leah
Who is Socrates?

 16 hours ago

Show older posts
Videos
Twins Commercial
00:32
Added: 3790 days ago
Views: 1562
view all >>
Favorites
Nothing found.
view all >>
Playlists
Nice Stuff

Videos: 19

view all >>
Photos
 Sample Caption
 Sample Caption
 Sample Caption
 My Photo
 Sample Caption
 Sample Caption
 Sample Caption
 Sample Caption
view all >>
Testimonials
Author Feedback Action
05/20/2017
Locke's concept of the state of nature, however, is equally questionable with that of Hobbes. When Locke delves into the question of property, he reasons well in his differentiation between the property of mankind and the property of a man. He even skirts on Marx's labor theory of value. It is interesting to compare Locke's theories with contemporary capitalist societies which claim to have a basis in Locke. I see little similarity between the two. Slavery (chattel and wage), exploitation, limited popular access to government, and social priorities which benefit a select part of society all challenge the west's claim to a Locke-style government system.

Locke believes that at the beginning man lived in common ownership of the earth (Locke, 18). Man is blessed with the ownership of property in his own person (Locke, 19). Rousseau argues, the contrary, saying man is not property. When man combines his labour, with land that is common to all men, he appropriates property in the land he tilled (Locke, 20). Ownership of anything was the fruit of man's labor. The man who picks the apples has ownership in those apples, because he combined his labour with that of nature (Locke, 19). Like Rousseau, Locke discusses the State of Nature. Locke's State of Nature differs from Rousseau's. Locke believes man in the State of Nature has the right to:
 
05/28/2017
Regardless of the government or law Hobbes believes "no man can transferre his Right to save himselfe from Death, Wounds, and Imprisonment" (Hobbes 199).

The young are stronger, but the old more cunning. The older an animal or human gets, the more knowledge they possess. This knowledge is gained mostly through experience. A person can spend years in a classroom studying various subjects, but until they actually use that knowledge, and experience in the field the knowledge is useless. Hume writes in Section IX;
 
05/24/2017
They are deprived of the opportunity of exchanging error for truth: if they are wrong, they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth, produced by its collision with error. . . . Those who desire to suppress it, of course deny its truth; but they are not infallible. They have no authority to decide the question of all mankind, and exclude every other person from the means of judging. (18)

Charles Manson was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on November 12, 1934. His mother, Kathleen Maddox, was just sixteen at the time of his birth. The only father the boy knew was William Manson, who adopted him after his marriage to Kathleen. This marriage was brief, leaving Charlie fatherless to an unfit mother.
 
05/19/2017
Two of Socrates' students attempted coups and failed. According to I.F. Stone, in his book Gadfly's Guilt: The Trial of Socrates, "Bloody political coups led by two of his best-known students, Alcibiades and Critias, overthrew democratic government in Athens in 411 and 404 B.C. the threat of a third coup in 401, triggered Socrates' trial, which took place two years later"(Stone, I.F. Qtd. in Elson, John. Books: Gadfly's Guilt: The Trial of Socrates. Time, 01-25-98, p.66). Stone, however, also argues that Socrates was "in reality a coldhearted, elitist, pro-Spartan snob who was openly contemptuous of Athens' Democracy and favored totalitarian rule by a philosopher-king"(Stone, I. F. Qtd. in Elson, John). That is not the intent of the paper. Plato's goal could not have been a Philosophical Monarchy, because the teachings of Socrates require the intellectual participation of many, or a Democracy. Plato's goal is a political philosophical change in the way the future rulers of the government think, not to over throw the government by force.

Now empirical method is the only method which can do justice to this inclusive integrity of "experience." It alone takes this integrated unity as the starting point for philosophic thought. Other methods begin with results of a reflection that has already torn in two the subject-matter experienced and the operations and states of experiencing. The problem is then to get together what has been sundered-which is as if the king's men started with the fragments of the egg and tried to construct the whole egg out of them. (Dewey, John, Experience and Nature. Dover: New York, 1958, P. 9)
 
05/28/2017
John Dewey was a student of the pragmatic philosophers Pierce and James. He was a mathematician. Pragmatism is based upon the philosophy of science. It seeks to find undoubtable truths. Like a scientist, the pragmatists try to disprove a fact or theory until there is no doubt. The pragmatist, however, believes there are no totally undoubtable truths, because truth can only be obtained by the future results of current events. Therefore, we never know if something is true until it proves to be so. What is accepted as a truth today, may be proven false in the future. For instance, it was at one time believed the world was flat, and the planets revolved around the earth. This was considered fact. However, when it was proven false, new ideas were accepted as facts, and will be accepted as fact until proven they are proven false. Pragmatic truths, therefore, are the future results of current events. There are no pragmatic truths or undoubtable facts, only probable truths based on empirical experience.

Now that it is easier to focus in on some of these topics, a clear and open mind must be available to allow the information that is going to be presented to register. This is where support is helpful, from a friend, teacher, parent, etc., especially for those who are not religious and are rather skeptical about the subjects, but want to be more convinced of its content.
 
view all >>
Blogs
At the age of 26, after many more theft charges, Charlie was sentenced to the U.S Penitentiary in Washington for violation of probation, theft and rape. Manson remained in the penitentiary until the a...
Bookmark
New
posted by Abigail
According to Descartes himself, his purpose for writing "Meditation" was to prove that there was nothing more un-doubtable in the universe than the existence of God.

Additionally, Hume speaks of mira...
Bookmark
posted by Abigail
view all >>
Classifieds
view all >>
Events
Bookmark
New
06/03/2017 12:37 am | Theoretically Model Rooted
Locke outlined the aims and purposes of the state in his "Two Treatises of Government", and by the time of the American Revolution, Locke's principles and philosophies were well known and deeply embed...
Bookmark
New
Featured
06/14/2017 2:59 am | Trade British
Hofstader, a supporter of Dewey's metaphysics describes "the aim of metaphysics as a general theory of existence. . .the discovery of the basic types of involvement's and their relationships" (Qtd in ...
Bookmark
New
Featured
06/14/2017 3:06 am | Motive Voluntary Defend
The knowledge gained from these experiences is not gathered through reasoning, but instinct.

Descartes goes on to say that he will try to prove not only that God exists, but that his existence is cle...
view all >>
Clubs
Bookmark
New
Mill notes that it may be further objected that a person may set a bad example for others by his actions and in that way do harm to others (75). Therefore, we should be concerned with everyone's actio...
Bookmark
New
Hume's arguments seem directed at Descartes. Hume argues that man gains knowledge from experience and that we should be skeptical of all other knowledge. Descartes believes all knowledge comes from th...
Bookmark
New
Dewey is asking us to accept the selective emphasis of the "inconclusive integrity of experience" as a starting point, but by doing so he is guilty of what he criticizes. How can there be "an empirica...
Bookmark
New
They are deprived of the opportunity of exchanging error for truth: if they are wrong, they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth, produced b...
Bookmark
New
An easy rebuttal to this objection is simply that we don't yet know the truth about electrons and water, and thus the form. This objection has no scientific basis. Any more accurate description of ele...
Bookmark
New
It seems that Augustine's view of grace versus free will reacts in a similar fashion. Grace is that act of god by which our souls can turn from a carnal and sinful existence to look toward the world a...
Bookmark
New
In defense of his teacher, and to disclose to all the truth of Socrates trial, Plato writes his version of the truth as he heard it. In the Apology Plato writes from the persona of his teacher, in the...
Bookmark
New
Now empirical method is the only method which can do justice to this inclusive integrity of "experience." It alone takes this integrated unity as the starting point for philosophic thought. Other meth...
view all >>
 
 
About
Gender: Female
Age: 35
Location: Tokelau, Atafu, Atafu
 
My Options
Bookmark Abigail
Add Abigail to Friends
Add Abigail to IM Contacts
Send Abigail a Message
Send Abigail an Instant Message
Send Abigail an eCard
Invite Abigail to Video Chat
Ignore Abigail
Invite Abigail to View Blog
Invite Abigail to Read Classified Ad
Invite Abigail to Club
 
Profile Brief
Member since: 04/10/2006
Profile last updated: 04/10/2006
Current Status: Offline
Total Photos: 8
Network:
1st handshakes: 8
Total: 8
 
Favorites
Del.icio.us
Digg
Furl
StumbleUpon
Google
Yahoo
Technorati
BlinkList
MySpace
Facebook
Twitter