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Jennifer
Gender: Female
Age: 61
Location: Malta, Outer Harbour, San Gwann
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Interests I'd like to share with others: Wine Tasting, Cooking, Sailing/Boating, Computers/Internet, Gardening, Spectator Sports, Books, magazines, Shopping/Antiques, Art, Drama-Plays/Musicals, Coffee, tea, and conversation, Fishing, No Answer, Politics, Camping, hiking, outdoor life, Dining out-I really like good food, Playing cards, Photography, Music, Television-I love TV, Animals/Pets, Speaking Different Languages, News, Family Outings
My Favorite Sports: Football, Aerobics, Windsurfing, Hockey, Tennis/Racquet Sports, Baseball, Rock Climbing, Yoga, Jogging, Swimming
Overview
The Social Contract also keeps people from being totally alienated and affords them better protection. If a large group of people enter a Social Contract, they can more easily defend themselves against their enemies, and criminals who live in societies with no Social Contract. Thus in spite of giving up some individual rights for the Social Contract, they have not lost any more freedom, because all within the society have surrendered their rights freely and equally, and suffer the same inequality. In other words, all things being equal, man is still free, and maintains autonomy. Everyone must surrender his or her rights for the social contract to work. If one person gives up their rights and another does not, the person who does not has power over the other person and there is no contract. However, it is to a person benefit to agree to the social contract, because by giving up the freedom of Natural Liberty an individual gains Civil Liberty. Natural Liberty is the freedom man maintains in the State of Nature. Civil Liberty is freedom you have in society, freedom gained from the social contract. Rousseau argues in chapter eight of the Social Contract, What man loses by the social contract is his natural liberty and an unlimited right to everything he tries to get and succeeds in getting; what he gains is civil liberty and the proprietorship of all he possesses. If we are to avoid mistake in weighing one against the other, we must clearly distinguish natural liberty, from civil liberty. . . (Rousseau, P.196)
I have always considered that the two questions respecting God and the Soul were the chief of those that ought to be demonstrated by philosophical rather than theological argument, that is, the questions of the existence of God and the immortality of the soul. (Qtd in Ockman, William)
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05/14/2017
The nineteenth century philosopher John Stuart Mill believed that for man to be truly free the rights and liberties of the individual must be guaranteed. Mill was concerned with what he called "Civil or Social Liberty: the nature and limits of the power which can be legitimately exercised over the individual" (Mill 13). Mill argues that there are two distinct parts of a person's life; that part of a person's life that "concerns himself only," and that part "which concerns others" (74).

If we apply Dewey to Dewey we find that his naturalistic metaphysics does not wash. Rorty is correct he makes the same mistakes he criticizes. How can there be a definitive naturalistic metaphysics of experience, if the world is constantly in flux and truth is only relevant to the values and meanings that currently define it? Will the naturalistic metaphysics of experience change with history like values and meanings? Will it change the different experiences of each individual? If the door no longer closes, but did close before, it still closed previously. The first experience does not change. It still remains true. Rorty explains:
 
05/18/2017
In defense of his teacher, and to disclose to all the truth of Socrates trial, Plato writes his version of the truth as he heard it. In the Apology Plato writes from the persona of his teacher, in the first person. Plato paints the picture of a man who is falsely accused of the crime of corrupting youth. Socrates, pretending to read an affidavit of one of his accusers, states: "Socrates is a criminal and a busybody, prying into things under the earth and into the heavens, and making the weaker argument strong and teaching these things to others" ("The Apology." Great Dialogues of Plato, Mentor Books, p.425).

The Socrates Plato describes refuses to accept payment for formal instruction, and had no school. Socrates taught by asking questions and inducing debate. The truth can only be discovered by eliminating what is not true. His goal was to teach the younger generation to think clearly, reasonably, philosophically.
 
05/20/2017
The statement is confusing. It seems that Dewey wishes to have his cake and eat it too. He spends over four hundred pages arguing that we should accept his method of philosophical criticism. Dewey criticizes other philosophers of selective emphasis then claims we should accept his theory of the ineluctable traits of natural existence as a starting point for philosophic discovery or his selective emphasis. Dewey's method of philosophy claims the world is constantly changing and that truth can only be obtained according to the values we place on it. Dewey shows how our values, experiences, and culture change what we perceive as true. Truth, like nature constantly changes and hence, cannot be predicted or permanently defined. Dewey, by offering a selective emphasis of the natural traits nature, Dewey is, once again, guilty of his own criticism. There cannot be a selective emphasis in the system of philosophy Dewey espouses. Dewey states of selective emphasis:

The best argument against interference of the life of an individual is made by Mill: "the strongest of all arguments against the interference of the public with purely personal conduct is that, when it does interfere, the odds are that it interferes wrongly, and in the wrong place" (78). The United States currently has many laws governing personal behavior that have failed miserably. The attempt to control drug use is a perfect example of the government "interfering wrongly in the wrong place." The use of drugs by individuals should not be of anyone's concern unless the user fails to meet his responsibilities to his family or others. We now live in a society where violent criminals are released early from jail punishment so that we can punish people for their individual behavior even though they have harmed no one. Mill is right we must stop punishing people for actions that harm no one but the individual performing the action. Man must quit being the judge of man when it comes to personal behavior. Individual Liberty must be guaranteed if we are to live in a truly free society.
 
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He then proceeds to eliminate the body and the senses from being without doubt, until he comes up with the one verifiable truth: Sensing? There can be no sensing in the absence of body; and besides I ...
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Subsequently, Hume's argument focuses on human testimony and the hesitation that mankind feels regarding the credibility of others' statements. He states that this hesitation stems from the "…Oppositi...
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Mill believes a person should never be punished because his actions set a bad example or because the public feels they can not act responsibly concerning their own being(76).

Socrates asserts that on...
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The prerequisites before embarking on a metaphysical path requires the two following things: a belief in a God and the possibility of an afterlife. If these two concepts are not met, one will have tro...
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Thomas Hobbes philosophized about the Nature of Man in the State of Nature. Hobbes believes that man in the State of Nature, in which there is no sovereign, would live like the beasts of the wild. Hob...
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No man has the obligation to put his life on the line unless to do so would cause the downfall of the sovereign. Hobbes states that "when the defence of the commonwealth, requireth at once the help of...
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Subsequently, Hume's argument focuses on human testimony and the hesitation that mankind feels regarding the credibility of others' statements. He states that this hesitation stems from the "…Oppositi...
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06/07/2017 4:51 pm | Created Settled Hinder
In order for the for-itself to have a project, especially a project which posits its own freedom, it must choose a grander goal than simply self-liberation and self-satisfying selfishness. Since freed...
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05/29/2017 9:36 pm | Parents Party
The fact that Kierkegaard's analysis is random musing and not dialectics is reinforced by the recurrence of old ambiguities as seen in Augustine: free will versus necessity. How can free will exist un...
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06/13/2017 5:14 am | Chairs Elements
The statement is confusing. It seems that Dewey wishes to have his cake and eat it too. He spends over four hundred pages arguing that we should accept his method of philosophical criticism. Dewey cri...
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Finally, each man, in giving himself to all, gives himself to nobody; and as there is no associate over which he does not acquire the same right as he yields others over himself, he gains an equivalen...
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Finally, each man, in giving himself to all, gives himself to nobody; and as there is no associate over which he does not acquire the same right as he yields others over himself, he gains an equivalen...
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Dewey is asking us to accept the selective emphasis of the "inconclusive integrity of experience" as a starting point, but by doing so he is guilty of what he criticizes. How can there be "an empirica...
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These clauses, properly understood, may be reduced to one, the total alienation of each associate, together with all his rights, to the whole community; for, in the first place, as each gives himself ...
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Profile Brief
 
Member since: 04/10/2006
Profile last updated: 04/10/2006
Current Status: Offline
Total Photos: 6
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